Book Review: Man from Macedonia

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This month I had the privilege of reviewing the book Man from Macedonia. While this book is not directly related to my field of Christian Apologetics, it is a milestone book that I would recommend to everyone – including Christian Apologists and atheists.

While this is the story of a man called by God to be a minister, it is such a relevant book, especially in this day and age, that I would recommend it to practically every demographic in the nation – Christian or non.

The man about whom this biographical account is written treads foot in so many landmark events of recent American history, that the book is as educational as it is profound and inspiring. Its principle character, Reverend Aaron Johnson, brushes shoulders with Martin Luther King, Chuck Coleson and even Ronald Regan – forming working relations or friendships with each of these famous individuals.

The book sees Johnson leading peaceful protests during the Civil Rights movement, going undercover among radical dissidents, negotiating peaceful resolutions with Black Panthers and Klan members alike (in one gripping story in the book, Johnson is blindfolded, thrown in a trunk and taken before a Klan meeting – and standing before them, convinces them to form diplomatic relations with an integration committee). Johnson somehow manages to be a caring minister to a country church, and a political leader at the same time, overhauling and improving North Carolina’s pitiful prison system.

The story is not just historically significant, politically educational, and spiritually inspiring; it is also action-packed. At various times, Johnson is dodging sniper bullets from radical dissidents, wading onto death row, and being kidnapped – twice. And the story is entirely true.

With narrative fodder this engaging, the final touch that makes this a worthwhile read is that the voice in which the story is told is so soft, profound and gripping that the narration alone could carry the tale.

Regardless of one’s political or religious views, this story is worth your while. I would easily recommend it to anyone.